Best way to place a new tea product?

Best way to place a new tea product?

Postby ellston98 » January 31st, 2014, 1:33 pm


I think as much as the product seems pretty interesting (I kinda like the choice of colors, and the packaging), you might wanna identify stronger 'selling points' for your product. From what I see, you've managed to list quite a number of benefits of drinking tea, and have also banked on the pyramid shape of the tea bags as 'pull factors' at the product level - which are great. But you might wanna identify a core target consumer group first, and target your messages specifically towards them, to 'create more relevance' at the emotional level. As a really random example off hand, since your tea is called 'Lady Orchid Ginseng Oolong Tea', which sounds a lil sophisticated, perhaps you could target 25-39 year old female working executives as your key target audience. Say, you talk about things like the anti-aging properties of your tea, and how it can benefit their hectic work schedules, and also on top of their usual skin care regime etc etc.

Now, we come to your original question of finding new sales channels. With the above key target audience in mind, find out what places they go to, what magazines they read, what websites they surf, and stuff like that. Then create exposure for your products there. All these focus and direction are meant to ensure you'll always instinctively know what to do. Perhaps, there're certain cafes that serve primarily this target audience. Talk to the cafe owners on how (and why) they could incorporate your tea as part of the menu, or, sell your tea as a complimentary product or on a consignment basis. Bank on how your product is relevant to their target audience when you talk to them, so there's a higher chance they'll buy-in to your proposal. Give them a cut of the margin if you have to. Additionally, perhaps just set up your own online sales channel on your website, other multi-label online stores, or, maybe gmarket? Again, with that target audience in mind, approach all relevant magazines, bloggers, and forums with nicely done editorial pieces or press kits, and ask for publishing space. Provide product samples where possible. Make sure the editorial is truly proprietary, provides value to readers, talks specifically about the benefits of your product, and draws traffic to at least one of your sales channels. Hire a professional copywriter if you have to. This cost is pretty affordable as compared to what you'll pay at cold storage, and considering the amount of exposure you'll get.

The gist here is, don't just bank on the major retailers for shelf space. Bank on creating a real 'brand', and really connect with your target audience. So that even if you lose a key sales channel, your consumers' recall levels and loyalty are still intact. Contact a professional to pan things out for you if you have some spare budget.

Hope this helps.
User avatar
ellston98
 
Posts: 43
Joined: June 29th, 2012, 7:38 am

Best way to place a new tea product?

Postby corben » January 31st, 2014, 1:33 pm


I think as much as the product seems pretty interesting (I kinda like the choice of colors, and the packaging), you might wanna identify stronger 'selling points' for your product. From what I see, you've managed to list quite a number of benefits of drinking tea, and have also banked on the pyramid shape of the tea bags as 'pull factors' at the product level - which are great. But you might wanna identify a core target consumer group first, and target your messages specifically towards them, to 'create more relevance' at the emotional level. As a really random example off hand, since your tea is called 'Lady Orchid Ginseng Oolong Tea', which sounds a lil sophisticated, perhaps you could target 25-39 year old female working executives as your key target audience. Say, you talk about things like the anti-aging properties of your tea, and how it can benefit their hectic work schedules, and also on top of their usual skin care regime etc etc.

Now, we come to your original question of finding new sales channels. With the above key target audience in mind, find out what places they go to, what magazines they read, what websites they surf, and stuff like that. Then create exposure for your products there. All these focus and direction are meant to ensure you'll always instinctively know what to do. Perhaps, there're certain cafes that serve primarily this target audience. Talk to the cafe owners on how (and why) they could incorporate your tea as part of the menu, or, sell your tea as a complimentary product or on a consignment basis. Bank on how your product is relevant to their target audience when you talk to them, so there's a higher chance they'll buy-in to your proposal. Give them a cut of the margin if you have to. Additionally, perhaps just set up your own online sales channel on your website, other multi-label online stores, or, maybe gmarket? Again, with that target audience in mind, approach all relevant magazines, bloggers, and forums with nicely done editorial pieces or press kits, and ask for publishing space. Provide product samples where possible. Make sure the editorial is truly proprietary, provides value to readers, talks specifically about the benefits of your product, and draws traffic to at least one of your sales channels. Hire a professional copywriter if you have to. This cost is pretty affordable as compared to what you'll pay at cold storage, and considering the amount of exposure you'll get.

The gist here is, don't just bank on the major retailers for shelf space. Bank on creating a real 'brand', and really connect with your target audience. So that even if you lose a key sales channel, your consumers' recall levels and loyalty are still intact. Contact a professional to pan things out for you if you have some spare budget.

Hope this helps.
User avatar
corben
 
Posts: 80
Joined: October 27th, 2011, 10:23 pm


Return to Orchids

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests

cron