Who's really responsible for the 112 deaths at the garment factory in Bangladesh?

Who's really responsible for the 112 deaths at the garment factory in Bangladesh?

Postby vaughan » January 18th, 2014, 6:05 am

In one line: The owner of the factory along with his top-management are solely responsible for this tragedy. I have answered a similar question a few days ago and I'd like to post the same here too:

What happened is that when the fire warning started the workers were not told that they must evacuate, rather many workers were prevented from leaving the exit door which wasn't locked as such. But when the fact was dawned upon the floor managers that it is indeed a real fire that started from the basement warehouse where combustible items alongside Yarns were stuffed. The most dangerous thing was that all the three internal stairways which were leading upto the rooftop were having landing at basement (warehouse). These staircases became 'chimneys' for the fire in the basements. The other irony was that the central staircase would lead to only one main-exit, since there was no other exit in the whole building.

These are fault of the building designer, construction engineer, fire department's corrupt inspectors and directors who would issue 'fire-licence' without even having a physical inspection of the building. The industrial building must have two or more exit staircase made of steel those would be linked with every floor so that in such situation workers of each floors could take outside exit door that would not have to face heat, smoke or toxic gas.

The greed of the owners to save money by cutting corner while the building was constructed couples with failure of compliance authorities were the root cause. The floor-level managers' natural impulse to hold back people from fleeing is also have to do with the owner and top managers' way or style of conducting business where they thought they can take 'chance' with workers safety rather face questioning from top-ups, if that alarm was a hoax.

I had been involved with industrial safety for a few years while working in a multi-national company. I remember how the management would take the weekly 'fire-drill' and how the workers also would casually participate. We faced one major fire incident and later found that no one acted the way they were suppose to act as per the fire-drill's instructions due to panic. No one was hurt but property was damaged but it became clear that the concept of safety (fire-drills are one aspect of safety) to be imbibed in the mind of top-management first and then trickle down to the floor worker. All the establishments must have adequate numbers of fire fighting equipment with water pond and hydrant connection having flow of waters under pressure (may be from overhead tank). Each floor must have all sorts of equipment to fight A,B,C and D type of fire. We would find that only Soda-Acid and Carbon-dioxide or some Helon-1211 (obsolete now) gases are kept in small cylinders. Central water sprinklers must be installed in each floor as per the set formula for their density and effectiveness. Smoke detectors must be installed in all the rooms irrespective of the shape or size or use.

See the answer from the owner of Tazreen Fashion when asked by the press "but nobody told me there was no emergency exit which could be made accessible from outside. Nobody even advised me to install one like that.... I could have done it but nobody ever suggested I do it". The person's background is having worked as Accounts-manager back in 1989. What could one expect from such 'novice' to know the Safety and Security aspect of such a huge establishment that was designed to be doomed and waiting to happen that unfortunately took 112 lives out of its total strength of 1163 (1137 workers were present in the factory when the incident occurred).

In the fine, we deplore the attitude of the owners and management the way they built the factory and then they way they conducted its operation till today when they are not coming into the open to speak out their apology and compensation plan. I am sure that like so many such fire incident the government would chose not to take drastic action for fear of losing its grip on the owners or revenues it earns from this sector. Unless the government is sincere and honest in conducting such affairs, we may have to live with more of the Tazreens syndrome with our utmost dismay.

Sorry for the long post.
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Who's really responsible for the 112 deaths at the garment factory in Bangladesh?

Postby dorian » January 18th, 2014, 6:05 am

In one line: The owner of the factory along with his top-management are solely responsible for this tragedy. I have answered a similar question a few days ago and I'd like to post the same here too:

What happened is that when the fire warning started the workers were not told that they must evacuate, rather many workers were prevented from leaving the exit door which wasn't locked as such. But when the fact was dawned upon the floor managers that it is indeed a real fire that started from the basement warehouse where combustible items alongside Yarns were stuffed. The most dangerous thing was that all the three internal stairways which were leading upto the rooftop were having landing at basement (warehouse). These staircases became 'chimneys' for the fire in the basements. The other irony was that the central staircase would lead to only one main-exit, since there was no other exit in the whole building.

These are fault of the building designer, construction engineer, fire department's corrupt inspectors and directors who would issue 'fire-licence' without even having a physical inspection of the building. The industrial building must have two or more exit staircase made of steel those would be linked with every floor so that in such situation workers of each floors could take outside exit door that would not have to face heat, smoke or toxic gas.

The greed of the owners to save money by cutting corner while the building was constructed couples with failure of compliance authorities were the root cause. The floor-level managers' natural impulse to hold back people from fleeing is also have to do with the owner and top managers' way or style of conducting business where they thought they can take 'chance' with workers safety rather face questioning from top-ups, if that alarm was a hoax.

I had been involved with industrial safety for a few years while working in a multi-national company. I remember how the management would take the weekly 'fire-drill' and how the workers also would casually participate. We faced one major fire incident and later found that no one acted the way they were suppose to act as per the fire-drill's instructions due to panic. No one was hurt but property was damaged but it became clear that the concept of safety (fire-drills are one aspect of safety) to be imbibed in the mind of top-management first and then trickle down to the floor worker. All the establishments must have adequate numbers of fire fighting equipment with water pond and hydrant connection having flow of waters under pressure (may be from overhead tank). Each floor must have all sorts of equipment to fight A,B,C and D type of fire. We would find that only Soda-Acid and Carbon-dioxide or some Helon-1211 (obsolete now) gases are kept in small cylinders. Central water sprinklers must be installed in each floor as per the set formula for their density and effectiveness. Smoke detectors must be installed in all the rooms irrespective of the shape or size or use.

See the answer from the owner of Tazreen Fashion when asked by the press "but nobody told me there was no emergency exit which could be made accessible from outside. Nobody even advised me to install one like that.... I could have done it but nobody ever suggested I do it". The person's background is having worked as Accounts-manager back in 1989. What could one expect from such 'novice' to know the Safety and Security aspect of such a huge establishment that was designed to be doomed and waiting to happen that unfortunately took 112 lives out of its total strength of 1163 (1137 workers were present in the factory when the incident occurred).

In the fine, we deplore the attitude of the owners and management the way they built the factory and then they way they conducted its operation till today when they are not coming into the open to speak out their apology and compensation plan. I am sure that like so many such fire incident the government would chose not to take drastic action for fear of losing its grip on the owners or revenues it earns from this sector. Unless the government is sincere and honest in conducting such affairs, we may have to live with more of the Tazreens syndrome with our utmost dismay.

Sorry for the long post.
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Who's really responsible for the 112 deaths at the garment factory in Bangladesh?

Postby northtun55 » January 18th, 2014, 6:10 am

Must have something to do with America. After all it happened almost right next door to us, in BANGLADESH. Geez.
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Who's really responsible for the 112 deaths at the garment factory in Bangladesh?

Postby chikae » January 18th, 2014, 6:21 am

The owners of the factory.
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