How does this quote affect the readers opinion?? What are the affects of the long sentences?

How does this quote affect the readers opinion?? What are the affects of the long sentences?

Postby amyneddgar71 » September 4th, 2013, 7:31 am

“Know you not that the evil one is immensely strong and cunning? Know you not that the Indians are in league with him, worshipping him in their forest? His forces lurk all, about, waiting in ambush in fern and thicket. They are even here among us, slithering like snakes, sly and unseen, hiding in the wainscot, like low creeping things…"
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How does this quote affect the readers opinion?? What are the affects of the long sentences?

Postby ellswerth » September 4th, 2013, 7:42 am

Is this from Witch Child? If not, then I'm going to sound really stupid... but if it is then Reverend Johnson makes use of rhetorical questions to engage his congregation (and therefore the reader, too). By referring to the Indians 'worshipping' the evil one in the forest, he makes a clear distinction between them and his own congregation - which makes the reader also see the distinction. He makes Biblical references... the snake and the 'low creeping things' to truly make his congregation fear and despise the people he talks of.
I'd say the sentences are fairly short - because they're so short, they are decisive and forceful... they have an impact on his congregation and the reader. He uses alliteration ('snakes, sly and unseen') to reflect the snakes' hisses and therefore add greater drama and impact to his speech.
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