Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby rei » October 14th, 2013, 1:33 pm

ok today i have received my new java fern and i got some questions.
Here is how the java fern looks like:
http://i45.tinypic.com/2ldcacn.jpg

Q1. I have noticed that java fern has a black spots on her leafs, i think it's nutrients deficiencies , what type of nutrients does she need?.

Q2. do i planted OK my java fern in the rock which shows in this picture?

Thank you
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Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby bradwr » October 14th, 2013, 1:37 pm

1. The black spots on your Java fern are just bruises from transport or something being netted out of the tank they were in. Do not worry about them. The typical black spots that form when a leave is mature and about to produce small plantlets look different. They are more like big freckles and small new plants start on the leaf margins.Fish waste is a good nutrient. If the lighting is sufficient, liquid fertilizers and CO2 injection will speed growth and propagation.

2. It almost looks like the roots and rhizomes are stuck in a hole in the rock. They should be spread out on the surface of the rock.

Burying them or confining them in a tight spot can kill the whole plant, and then you will have a few tiny refugees that form on the dying leaves. BTW it sounds like one of the other Answerers may have buried his Java fern, watched it die, and then buried the survivors each time until he had very tiny Java ferns at the end.

If you cut leaves off, they will die, usually without producing any offspring. When a Java fern gets too big for the spot it's in, untangle the rhizomes (horizontal stems) carefully and cut them at a junction if they have not already grown apart. There should be at least four or five good size leaves on each section you separate.

Undemanding plants.

Cryptocorynes grow slowly at first but once they get over transplant shock, they will spread out all over the bottom of a low light aquarium. Crypts are noted as low light plants, but they will grow at any light intensity. One of my favorite low light plants is Chara. It does well without planting it. In a tank with a lot of Chara, which is also called muskgrass or stonewort, you will hardly ever see any algae. If the water is very hard, the Chara will remove the calcium from the water and the underside of the plant will turn white with calcium and become very brittle, almost like a fragile kind of coral. Baby tears and Naja are fast growers. I once bought a big bag of baby tears another fish club member had turned in for HAP points (Horticulture Award Program). Within a month it had grown to fill a 150 gallon aquarium top to bottom and side to side. Turtle grass (Vallisneria), if it "likes" your tank, will grow fast and spread all over the tank by strawberry-like runners, if you have ever seen how strawberries grow. It likes sand or fine gravel, and a bit of water current.
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Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby farand » October 14th, 2013, 1:41 pm

1. The black spots on your Java fern are just bruises from transport or something being netted out of the tank they were in. Do not worry about them. The typical black spots that form when a leave is mature and about to produce small plantlets look different. They are more like big freckles and small new plants start on the leaf margins.Fish waste is a good nutrient. If the lighting is sufficient, liquid fertilizers and CO2 injection will speed growth and propagation.

2. It almost looks like the roots and rhizomes are stuck in a hole in the rock. They should be spread out on the surface of the rock.

Burying them or confining them in a tight spot can kill the whole plant, and then you will have a few tiny refugees that form on the dying leaves. BTW it sounds like one of the other Answerers may have buried his Java fern, watched it die, and then buried the survivors each time until he had very tiny Java ferns at the end.

If you cut leaves off, they will die, usually without producing any offspring. When a Java fern gets too big for the spot it's in, untangle the rhizomes (horizontal stems) carefully and cut them at a junction if they have not already grown apart. There should be at least four or five good size leaves on each section you separate.

Undemanding plants.

Cryptocorynes grow slowly at first but once they get over transplant shock, they will spread out all over the bottom of a low light aquarium. Crypts are noted as low light plants, but they will grow at any light intensity. One of my favorite low light plants is Chara. It does well without planting it. In a tank with a lot of Chara, which is also called muskgrass or stonewort, you will hardly ever see any algae. If the water is very hard, the Chara will remove the calcium from the water and the underside of the plant will turn white with calcium and become very brittle, almost like a fragile kind of coral. Baby tears and Naja are fast growers. I once bought a big bag of baby tears another fish club member had turned in for HAP points (Horticulture Award Program). Within a month it had grown to fill a 150 gallon aquarium top to bottom and side to side. Turtle grass (Vallisneria), if it "likes" your tank, will grow fast and spread all over the tank by strawberry-like runners, if you have ever seen how strawberries grow. It likes sand or fine gravel, and a bit of water current.
Do not bury the rhizome, the meaty rootlike structure that the leaves emerge from. This part of the plant should be exposed. The best method for attachment is to gently band the rhizome to whatever bit of rockwork or bogwood you are intending to be the substrate. I've found that cutting bands out of discarded pantihose makes a slightly elastic and easily disposable tool for attachment and after a few months can simply be snipped of with a scissors. This method also is advisable for another rhizome emergent plant Anubius nana. Either plant will die if the rhizome is buried.
As to nutritional additives, don't bother,Java Fern requires nearly no nutrients at all. Using plant foods will only encourage algal growth.
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Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby abiel » October 14th, 2013, 1:44 pm

The black dots are where you will get new plants forming That is what Java fern do you will notice as the weeks go on roots start to form then plants and you gently remove them and plant them .
My java fern is planted in driftwood and bog wood never planted it in rock before so i am not sure whether it will be ok .
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Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby isidoro » October 14th, 2013, 1:55 pm

Within 6 months, you will hate java ferns and will never own another one in your lifetime. 1 will quickly turn into 1 with 10 mini ferns, those 10 will grow and produce 10 more mini ferns...eventually your filters will be plugged with java ferns :p

We've all tried this, don't worry...you're not the first.

Buy plants regardless of the online info and try them in your tank, I've had high light plants that require Co2 do great in a low light tank. I've struggled to keep "weeds" like duckweed, frogbits and java moss in the past because I just have too much current in my tanks due to over filtering my overstocked tanks...

Plants are fun, find the ones that work best for you :)
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Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby amo » October 14th, 2013, 2:03 pm

it will clear once it fixes itself into it's new enviroment.. remember to wash off that planet prior to turning it into the new environment.. may have snail deposits and eggs all over it.. which can be detrimental in a few situations.
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Aquarium java fern questions? aquarium live plant?

Postby rudolph » October 14th, 2013, 2:07 pm

There is no... Answered Q1 well. As for Q2, the Java Fern should be fine on the rock.
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